Peace And Faith

fluffyfit:

surimistick:

i was making a lot of mistakes and then my archery instructor said:

“you make mistakes because you’re focusing on the target and not on your actions”

and i was like woah

thanks for giving me the best life advice i’ve ever gotten

guys just think about how applicable this is to EVERYFUCKINGTHING

thescienceofjohnlock:

loving-together-living-apart:

bridgemcgidge:

shercockandmycrotch:


everyone needs a waving snail on their blog

i feel that if I scroll past this and don’t reblog it the snail is going to look to the ground and cry

that comment
im sold
gotta do it now

…
I’ve just been emotionally blackmailed by a cartoon snail.

It turns evil and sucks out your soul
bookmarkedpages:

superwholockalypse:

dreamingofdoctorwho:

colorsofsocialjustice:

colorsofsocialjustice:

contra-indication:

spondylitis:

The nerve!….This goes out to all the spoonies.
Read this:
“My name is Emelie Crecco, I’m 20 years old and I have cystic fibrosis. CF affects the lungs (as of many organs in the body) because of this I have a handicapped sticker. I’m not one to “abuse” the sticker, meaning I use it when I’m having a “bad day” (some days its a little harder to breathe). Today was HOT so I needed to use my sticker. I was running errands all day around my town, I pulled into a handicapped spot, placed the sticker in my mirror and continued into the store. Upon returning to my car I found a note written by someone, it said “Shame on you, you are NOT handicapped. You have taken a space that could have been used by an actually handicapped person. You are a selfish young lady.” I was LIVID. How can someone be so ignorant and cowardly? They clearly saw me walk out of my car, why not approach me? Not all handicaps are visible. I would love for you to share this story. It would help spread awareness for CF, but it would help open people’s minds to what handicapped really is.  Thank you for your time” ~Emelie Crecco

A friend of mine fell over 20 feet and basically broke half his ribs, punctured his lung, broke his arm in three places that required many surgeries to fix and messed up a nerve in his leg. He had to walk with a cane for a long time after it and some lady in a restaurant thought he was just walking with a cane for the hell of it and she ripped it from his hands and grabbed his messed up arm and shook him and told him he was an awful human being for pretending to be handicapped. What the fuck people?

This is what real ableism looks like.

I have ulcerative colitis, an autoimmune disorder which causes my body to attack my colon, and I qualify for one of those stickers. I’m scared to get one, though, because I look healthy and whole.-Orange

A mutual friend of mine’s mother has severe fibromyalgia (that gives her a handicapped pass) and as she was walking to her car after buying her groceries, a man actually lunged at her and started yelling at her about her “not looking handicapped”. It left her mother shaking and crying, of course, and it just makes me so angry how awful and ignorant some people can be. 

Not all handicaps are visible
Can I just pin this sentence on every lamppost all over the planet please

I’m 21 and have Fibromyalgia (because it effects young people too. I got diagnosed when I was 16 or 17) and I could get a handicap plate/sticker/tag thing. I was honestly going to at one point because I was in a bad period of it. I had trouble breathing from the pain and had to hold onto someone to walk and had to basically drop out of high school because of it. Not only that, but my memory completely left me for a while. I would repeat myself over and over and over and it scared me.
Because you couldn’t see it a “friend” of mine started spreading shit about me around school saying I wasn’t actually sick because I was going to go to FL with my mom to visit family and was going to go to the Universal to go the HP park. I got a lot of shit and had to explain that it was only because I needed something small like this trip to get away from the constant health tests and being in the hospital. As it was, it was so bad I couldn’t do anything and had a major panic attack.
I shouldn’t have had to explain ANY of this. I shouldn’t have had to feel bad about it and I did. 
blackgirlsrpretty2:

emiliogorgeous:

incredible.


wow!!!!
thepeoplesrecord:

One year anniversary of the murder of Islan Nettles: How long will we wait for justice?August 17, 2014
Sunday marks one year since 21-year-old Islan Nettles was brutally killed on a street near her home in Harlem. Nettles, an African-American transgender woman, was a design intern at a fashion company. She was beaten to death in the early hours of Aug. 17, in the shadow of the NYPD Housing Bureau’s Service Area 6 .
Yet she — and transgender people around New York City and the world — are still waiting for justice from the NYPD and Manhattan District Attorney. Activity in the investigation, if there has been any, remains shrouded behind a disturbing veil of secrecy.
Nettles had been walking with a group of transgender friends when they came upon a group of young men who subjected them to catcalls and harassment of a type familiar to many women in New York City.
But the catcalling took a violent turn when the men apparently realized that she and her friends were transgender.
Nettles was beaten badly enough that she needed to be hospitalized. At the hospital, she lapsed into a coma. Four days later, she was brain dead. Life support was turned off. She was gone.
While she was in the hospital, the police arrested her alleged assailant. Witnesses reported that he had pushed Nettles to the ground, climbed on top of her and beat her repeatedly while screaming anti-gay and anti-transgender slurs.
Despite this, he was charged only with misdemeanor assault. Of course, Nettles hadn’t yet died at the time of his arrest, and he therefore couldn’t be charged with anything related to her death. But it was still difficult to shake the feeling that the authorities did not take this attack very seriously.
After Nettles died, charges were dropped against this assailant. The expectation was that new charges would be brought against him stemming from her death.
Those never came.
Instead, it appeared that the investigation lost steam. Explanations floated around. The one most commonly heard was that a second man had stepped forward claiming responsibility for killing Islan, but that he was too drunk to remember it clearly.
The various accounts only compound the sense that prosecuting the man who killed Nettles in what is by all appearances a hate crime simply isn’t a priority for the police and district attorney.
In November, the Manhattan DA’s office stated that it was still “aggressively investigating” Nettles’ death.
But the investigation hardly feels aggressive. It’s been a year and there has been little visible effort spent on finding justice.
For the transgender community — scarred by a long and difficult history of violence and an often uneasy relationship with law enforcement — the vacuum of information makes reasonable community members question whether or not resources are truly being directed towards this investigation.
After a year of claims about their commitment to justice, it’s time for officials to become more transparent about their investigation.
Transgender people, and transgender women of color in particular, face harassment and violence on a regular basis. All too often, crimes committed against them go unpunished.
But their lives matter. Islan Nettles’ life mattered. It mattered to her friends, to her family and to her community.
Every day, I work with many transgender women of color like Nettles who astound me with their strength and resilience in the face of widespread discrimination and violence and seeming indifference from authorities.
Transgender people are gaining more visibility, acceptance and legal protection every day. But violence remains a daily part of life. We must demand accountability from law enforcement and an end to anti-transgender violence and discrimination.
Source
Islan Nettles is yet another trans sister whose life will not be forgotten. Demand justice now!
Rally to Honor the Legacy of Islan NettlesSunday, August 17th, 2014 3:30 p.m.Across from the police precinct, 147th street and Frederick Douglas BLVD
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